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Quench'd: The Power of Mountain Bike Clinics

June 22nd, 2024 | by Gabriela Hydle

We are proud to welcome one of our wonderful Bivo ambassadors today, Gabriela Hydle! She shares how she was introduced to mountain biking and how that eventually led her to start her own non profit to inspire kids to mountain bike in Spanish. Thank you for sharing your story, Gabriela!

Before I write about my experience in the cycling world, I would like to share a little about me and my journey. Seqër! I am an indigenous Mayan Guatemalan woman, I love the opportunity to bring diversity, equity and inclusivity into the biking world.

In 2020, I had a baby three days before lockdown, and my life as a mom of a second child and a toddler changed considerably. During the pandemic, my older brother died of Covid in January of 2021 in Guatemala. We dedicated our lives as parents to caring for our two children, staying close to home, and sheltering our children from what was going on in the world by spending a lot of time in the mountains, hiking and biking.

In June of 2022, I came across a schedule for a Latina Clinic for mountain biking with COMBA (Colorado Mountain Bike Association). Previously I had been very intimidated by mountain biking and would limit myself to rides along bike paths, but something changed when I started these clinics! Through COMBA, a group of BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) people met for their Latina clinic. I was supported by the coaches and encouraged by the group: a collection of women or people who identify as one. 

Many of us hadn’t ridden a bike in years, and some of us, including me, didn’t even own a bike. At the beginning, there were a few falls and failures, but finding a group that facilitated this kind of activity meant the world to me. 

We are proud to welcome one of our wonderful Bivo ambassadors today, Gabriela Hydle! She shares how she was introduced to mountain biking and how that eventually led her to start her own non profit to inspire kids to mountain bike in Spanish. Thank you for sharing your story, Gabriela!

Before I write about my experience in the cycling world, I would like to share a little about me and my journey. Seqër! I am an indigenous Mayan Guatemalan woman, I love the opportunity to bring diversity, equity and inclusivity into the biking world.

In 2020, I had a baby three days before lockdown, and my life as a mom of a second child and a toddler changed considerably. During the pandemic, my older brother died of Covid in January of 2021 in Guatemala. We dedicated our lives as parents to caring for our two children, staying close to home, and sheltering our children from what was going on in the world by spending a lot of time in the mountains, hiking and biking.

In June of 2022, I came across a schedule for a Latina Clinic for mountain biking with COMBA (Colorado Mountain Bike Association). Previously I had been very intimidated by mountain biking and would limit myself to rides along bike paths, but something changed when I started these clinics! Through COMBA, a group of BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) people met for their Latina clinic. I was supported by the coaches and encouraged by the group: a collection of women or people who identify as one. 

Many of us hadn’t ridden a bike in years, and some of us, including me, didn’t even own a bike. At the beginning, there were a few falls and failures, but finding a group that facilitated this kind of activity meant the world to me. 

Hearing words of empowerment in your own language can completely change the perspective of any new adventure you embark on, and I believe that when you find joy in what you are doing, the stars align, and the world opens to you.

I developed a passion for mountain biking that inspired me to leave my comfort zone and encouraged me to do something I had never done before. The motivation and inspiration I received from every single person throughout my journey was amazing, and it made me think of how I could inspire other people! They too could be exposed to such an incredible experience!

2 years after I started my journey into mountain biking, I was inspired to start a non-profit to inspire children to bike in Spanish. This non-profit is called Jamalil, which means libertad, or freedom. A bike to me is a vehicle for me to find freedom in the mountains, one step, hill, rock or pedal at a time. Biking for me is like living life. If there is a rock in the middle of the path, I must watch for it, pass it, and continue moving forward. All the while the wind blows past my hair, everything in my mind staying focused and energetic at the same time.

What if we could cheer each other on, inspiring and empowering one another? Not just here, in Guatemala, but everywhere else!

Today, I am currently working on my mountain bike trainer certification. I plan and hold a variety of LatinX, and BIPOC events to help inspire others in the sporting community. I get the opportunity to volunteer with some amazing groups, speak through multiple outlets, and, in general, try to stay as involved with the community as possible.

If you’re ever interested, you can always find me @gabrielahydle, and we can go for a rodada. -Gabriela Hydle 

Hearing words of empowerment in your own language can completely change the perspective of any new adventure you embark on, and I believe that when you find joy in what you are doing, the stars align, and the world opens to you.

I developed a passion for mountain biking that inspired me to leave my comfort zone and encouraged me to do something I had never done before. The motivation and inspiration I received from every single person throughout my journey was amazing, and it made me think of how I could inspire other people! They too could be exposed to such an incredible experience!

2 years after I started my journey into mountain biking, I was inspired to start a non-profit to inspire children to bike in Spanish. This non-profit is called Jamalil, which means libertad, or freedom. A bike to me is a vehicle for me to find freedom in the mountains, one step, hill, rock or pedal at a time. Biking for me is like living life. If there is a rock in the middle of the path, I must watch for it, pass it, and continue moving forward. All the while the wind blows past my hair, everything in my mind staying focused and energetic at the same time.

What if we could cheer each other on, inspiring and empowering one another? Not just here, in Guatemala, but everywhere else!

Today, I am currently working on my mountain bike trainer certification. I plan and hold a variety of LatinX, and BIPOC events to help inspire others in the sporting community. I get the opportunity to volunteer with some amazing groups, speak through multiple outlets, and, in general, try to stay as involved with the community as possible.

If you’re ever interested, you can always find me @gabrielahydle, and we can go for a rodada. -Gabriela Hydle 

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